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ResisterA Story of Protest and Prison during the Vietnam War$
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Bruce Dancis

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780801452420

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801452420.001.0001

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Politics in Prison, or Keeping Up with the Outside World

Politics in Prison, or Keeping Up with the Outside World

Chapter:
(p.303) Chapter Sixteen Politics in Prison, or Keeping Up with the Outside World
Source:
Resister
Author(s):

Bruce Dancis

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801452420.003.0017

The author talks about the politics in the Federal Youth Center. From a political standpoint, the author says his first days in Ashland were both reassuring and alarming. He immediately met his fellow draft resisters because, with sympathetic inmates working in the prison admissions department, word spread quickly that he was a new inmate. He describes three types of draft resisters in Ashland and expresses his views about the gay liberation movement as well as the emerging women’s liberation movement. He also discusses his involvement with the student New Left and his desire to continue their political education while in prison; his strategy of lying low and avoiding confrontations or direct conflicts with the prison authorities; his ten-day time in the D Block detention/segregation unit, also known as “the hole”; and his program of self-education in Ashland by reading books. Finally, he recounts his efforts to stay in touch with the draft resistance movement outside Ashland.

Keywords:   politics, Federal Youth Center, Ashland, gay liberation movement, women’s liberation movement, New Left, self-education, draft resistance, reading

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