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Feeling Like SaintsLollard Writings after Wyclif$
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Fiona Somerset

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780801452819

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801452819.001.0001

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Moral Fantasie

Moral Fantasie

Normative Allegory in Lollard Writings

Chapter:
(p.205) Chapter 6 Moral Fantasie
Source:
Feeling Like Saints
Author(s):

Fiona Somerset

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801452819.003.0007

This chapter examines the extent of the common ground, of both theory and practice, between lollards and their contemporaries both academic and extramural, as well as between lollards and mainstream tradition. This common ground has sometimes been denied, even now, by those who want to insist instead that lollards are fleshly adherents to the letter of the biblical sense, who “inspiciunt sacram scripturam et solum capiunt litteram et non sensum” (“search through holy scripture and take only the letter, and not the sense”). The chapter argues that such an accusation does not apply to lollard writers, any more than it will to Wyclif, for their biblical interpretations are just as devoted to uncovering the spiritual sense of scripture by means of the full range of interpretative methods available to them in the Christian tradition as those of any of their contemporaries.

Keywords:   lollard interpretation, biblical interpretations, Christian tradition, mainstream tradition, religious culture, interpretative methods, moral fantasie, normative allegory

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