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They Never Come BackA Story of Undocumented Workers from Mexico$
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Frans J. Schryer

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780801453144

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801453144.001.0001

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“I Feel Sorry for Them”

“I Feel Sorry for Them”

Chapter:
(p.50) 4 “I Feel Sorry for Them”
Source:
They Never Come Back
Author(s):

Frans J. Schryer

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801453144.003.0005

This chapter argues that the dysfunctional American immigration policy is largely responsible for the emotional trauma, tragedies, and family separations experienced by migrant workers and their families. American authorities do not allow the millions of workers who are essential to the U.S. economy to work legally. They are also making it almost impossible for those migrant Mexican workers to cross the border. The women in the United States who leave their children in the care of someone else in Mexico would probably not have made this painful decision if they and their husbands had been able to move freely across the border. Children and teenagers would have more contact with their fathers and with their siblings. Indeed, migrants started coming home for visits less frequently when it became more challenging to cross the border.

Keywords:   American immigration policy, migrant workers, U.S. economy, Mexican workers, migrant families

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