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"Who, What Am I?"Tolstoy Struggles to Narrate the Self$
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Irina Paperno

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780801453342

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801453342.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
"Who, What Am I?"
Author(s):

Irina Paperno

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801453342.003.0001

This introductory chapter provides an overview of Leo Tolstoy's attempts to describe and define his own self through his nonfiction first-person writings. In his early diaries, the young Tolstoy worked on developing a method for capturing, in their entirety, his past, present, and future. In the course of the 1850s, Tolstoy made a transition from diary-writing to professional authorship and fiction. In all of Tolstoy's self-narratives, from his first diaries to his religious treatises, there is an essential moral and social dimension to the question of the self. He knew that to know and to say who you are is to be oriented in moral space, deciding, “What ought I to do?”—a question which he addressed in a number of writings, from early pedagogical essays to the intensely personal treatise that deals with his later attempts to help the urban poor, What Should We Do Then? (1882–89).

Keywords:   Leo Tolstoy, self, nonfiction, diaries, fiction, self-narratives, religious treatises, moral space, pedagogical essays

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