Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Under the Strain of ColorHarlem's Lafargue Clinic and the Promise of an Antiracist Psychiatry$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Gabriel N. Mendes

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780801453502

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801453502.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM Cornell University Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.cornell.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Cornell University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in Cornell for personal use. date: 27 July 2021

“This Burden of Consciousness”

“This Burden of Consciousness”

Richard Wright and the Psychology of Race Relations, 1927–1947

Chapter:
(p.20) 1 “This Burden of Consciousness”
Source:
Under the Strain of Color
Author(s):

Gabriel N. Mendes

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801453502.003.0002

This chapter explores Wright’s involvement in Communism and Marxism. Born in Jim Crow Mississippi in 1908 during the time of the Great Migration, Wright and his family settled in Chicago where he learned the tenets of Marxism and joined the Communist Party (CP) in 1932. During those years, he began to incorporate new theories of modern human social structures and culture being developed by the famed Chicago School of sociology, in particular the work of Robert Ezra Park and Louis Wirth. The remainder of the chapter highlights Wright’s efforts to establish an institutional structure that aims to transform the way Americans discussed and approached relations between white and black people, both “inter-personally” and collectively.

Keywords:   Richard Wright, Communism, Marxism, Great Migration, Communist Party, Robert Ezra Park, Louis Wirth, black people, inter-personally

Cornell Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.