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Chinese Economic StatecraftCommercial Actors, Grand Strategy, and State Control$
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William J. Norris

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780801454493

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801454493.001.0001

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Economics and China’s Grand Strategy

Economics and China’s Grand Strategy

Chapter:
(p.44) 3 Economics and China’s Grand Strategy
Source:
Chinese Economic Statecraft
Author(s):

William J. Norris

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801454493.003.0004

This chapter examines the role of economics in China's grand strategy as it rises to great power status in the international system. A good deal of China's post-1978 foreign policy has been focused on facilitating the country's economic development. Increasingly, China finds itself in a position in which it may be able to leverage its growing economic power to advance its foreign policy goals. This chapter begins with an overview of grand strategy as an analytical concept in international relations. It then considers China as a strategic actor and the evolving role of economics in China's contemporary grand strategy, along with Deng Xiaoping's reassessment and strategic reorientation of China toward economic development. It also explains how much of China's modern foreign policy has been designed to serve the requirements of economic development and the international integration of a rising China. Finally, it discusses the utility of economic statecraft in pursuing China's grand strategy.

Keywords:   economics, China, grand strategy, foreign policy, economic development, economic power, international relations, Deng Xiaoping, economic statecraft

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