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Chinese Economic StatecraftCommercial Actors, Grand Strategy, and State Control$
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William J. Norris

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780801454493

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801454493.001.0001

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“Going Out” and China’s Search For Energy Security

“Going Out” and China’s Search For Energy Security

Chapter:
(p.69) 4 “Going Out” and China’s Search For Energy Security
Source:
Chinese Economic Statecraft
Author(s):

William J. Norris

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801454493.003.0005

This chapter examines the challenge of state control with regard to the China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC). It considers how the state utilizes economic statecraft in the context of efforts to secure oil through the creation and subsequent “going out” of the Chinese national oil corporations, which were among the earliest Chinese commercial actors to venture abroad. The chapter begins with a historical background on China's petroleum industry and its relationship to the Chinese state before turning to a discussion of the CNPC's early efforts to venture abroad. In particular, it discusses the CNPC's activities in Sudan and the strategic difficulties caused by the state's “going out” policy. It also explains how Chinese authorities sought to re-establish control over the international activities of its commercial actors in the extractive resources sector through balance of relative resources and unity of the state.

Keywords:   state control, China National Petroleum Corporation, economic statecraft, national oil corporations, commercial actors, China, petroleum industry, Sudan, going out policy

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