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Everyone CountsCould "Participatory Budgeting" Change Democracy?$
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Josh Lerner

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780801456657

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801456657.001.0001

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Money Talks

Money Talks

Chapter:
(p.5) Money Talks
Source:
Everyone Counts
Author(s):

Josh Lerner

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801456657.003.0002

This chapter examines the concept of “participatory budgeting” (PB). Since the centuries-old political institutions are ailing, perhaps a dose of modern technology could revive them; and since people are indifferent to public meetings and polling stations, perhaps they would show up for something online. Using the PB process, people decide how to spend part of the city budget through an annual series of neighborhood, district, and citywide assemblies. At these meetings, community members and elected budget delegates discuss community needs and set spending priorities. The United Nations and World Bank name PB a best practice of democratic governance. Most PB processes concern municipal spending, but states, counties, schools, and housing authorities have also begun using it for their own budgets.

Keywords:   participatory budgeting, PB process, city budget, citywide assemblies, United Nations, World Bank, democratic governance

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