Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Petrarchism at WorkContextual Economies in the Age of Shakespeare$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

William J. Kennedy

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781501700019

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501700019.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM Cornell University Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.cornell.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Cornell University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in Cornell for personal use. date: 29 May 2020

Jeweler’s Daughter Sings for Doge

Jeweler’s Daughter Sings for Doge

Gaspara Stampa’s Entrepreneurial Poetics

Chapter:
(p.76) Chapter 3 Jeweler’s Daughter Sings for Doge
Source:
Petrarchism at Work
Author(s):

William J. Kennedy

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501700019.003.0004

This chapter argues that Stampa belonged to an elite upper-middle-class literary culture, although she palpably refused to promote herself within it. In the absence of documents about the poet’s personal life, history has mythologized Stampa as a courtesan who sold herself along with poetry and music to clients whom she entertained with sonnets, songs, and sexual favors. Stampa’s emphasis upon her speaker’s personal life proved sensational in a society that valued discretion, less because of its frankly sexual content than because of its challenge to propriety. The poet’s open avoidance of self-promotion thus complements the aims of a social, cultural, moral, and economic revival underway since the 1540s.

Keywords:   Gaspara Stampa, literary culture, self-promotion, entrepreneurial poetics, economic revival

Cornell Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.