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Euripides’s Revolution under CoverAn Essay$
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Pietro Pucci

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781501700613

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501700613.001.0001

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Hermione: The Andromache

Hermione: The Andromache

Chapter:
11. Hermione: The Andromache
Source:
Euripides’s Revolution under Cover
Author(s):

Pietro Pucci

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501700613.003.0011

This chapter examines Hermione's explanation of her downfall in Andromache within the context of sexual desire. Hermione, the wife of Neoptolemus, finds herself sexually and affectively shunned by her husband, who prefers his concubine, Andromache, the wife of the dead Hector. Humiliated by this situation, Hermione, during Neoptolemus's absence, tries and fails to kill the child Andromache had with him. Hermione then expects Neoptolemus to come back and kill her. At this point an earlier suitor of hers, Orestes, appears, and Hermione explains her situation. This chapter considers Hermione's corruption, which she blames on language and mimetic influence. It also discusses Euripides's claim that language is an inescapable instance of otherness.

Keywords:   language, Hermione, Andromache, sexual desire, corruption, Euripides, otherness

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