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Mourning in AmericaRace and the Politics of Loss$
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David W. McIvor

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781501704956

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501704956.001.0001

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A Splintering and Shattering Activity

A Splintering and Shattering Activity

Truth, Reconciliation, Mourning

Chapter:
(p.130) 5 A Splintering and Shattering Activity
Source:
Mourning in America
Author(s):

David W. McIvor

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501704956.003.0005

This chapter examines the nettlesome politics of reconciliation from within the framework of public mourning developed over the preceding chapters. Like many interpreters of the politics of reconciliation, it focuses primarily on the South African experience. Not only has the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission become the most widely surveyed and scrutinized reconciliation process, it has also become exemplary for communities seeking an extrajudicial “rejoinder” to traumatic events in their past, such as Greensboro. South Africa's transition from apartheid rule in the 1990s is commonly seen as the paradigmatic case of how societies torn by deep and seemingly intractable conflicts can account for or in some respect come to terms with a violent past and all the ways in which the present has been shaped by that past.

Keywords:   public mourning, reconciliation, South Africa, apartheid, South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission

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