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Invisible WeaponsLiturgy and the Making of Crusade Ideology$
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M. Cecilia Gaposchkin

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781501705151

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501705151.001.0001

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Celebrating the Capture of Jerusalem in the Holy City

Celebrating the Capture of Jerusalem in the Holy City

Chapter:
(p.130) 4 Celebrating the Capture of Jerusalem in the Holy City
Source:
Invisible Weapons
Author(s):

M. Cecilia Gaposchkin

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501705151.003.0006

With the successful conclusion of the First Crusade, the crusaders established the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem and immediately established a liturgical thanksgiving for what they saw as the miracle of the First Crusade. This chapter looks in detail at the feast day that was established shortly after 1099 to commemorate the 15 July victory and capture of the city. The liturgy expressed the providential and perhaps even apocalyptic outlook of the early crusades, expressing an utterly triumphant interpretation of the Franks' role in providential history, confirming a new stage in the history of the Church and God's promise to these new Israelites of a new Jerusalem.

Keywords:   First Crusade, Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem, liturgical thanksgiving, liturgy, feast day, Franks

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