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Invisible WeaponsLiturgy and the Making of Crusade Ideology$
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M. Cecilia Gaposchkin

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781501705151

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501705151.001.0001

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Echoes of Victory in the West

Echoes of Victory in the West

Chapter:
(p.165) 5 Echoes of Victory in the West
Source:
Invisible Weapons
Author(s):

M. Cecilia Gaposchkin

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501705151.003.0007

This chapter follows the returning crusaders back to the West, with their memories of 1099, to examine the ways in which the story of the First Crusade was commemorated liturgically. Looking mostly at France—the heartland of the crusades and the area for which the overwhelming majority of the evidence survives—shows the ways in which the fact of the great victory was inscribed into the liturgical worldview. Because the chapter draws on both strictly liturgical, and paraliturgical material, this material also shows that the liturgical commemoration of 15 July was not an exclusively clerical discourse. In these liturgical and quasi-liturgical forms, we see the ways in which the different spheres—liturgy, narrative, local memory—could intertwine and mutually reinforce.

Keywords:   crusaders, liturgy, First Crusade, liturgical commemoration, France, sacred song

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