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New York Amish, 2nd EditionLife in the Plain Communities of the Empire State$
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Karen Johnson-Weiner

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781501707605

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501707605.001.0001

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The Future of New York’s Amish

The Future of New York’s Amish

Two Worlds, Side by Side

Chapter:
(p.206) 10 The Future of New York’s Amish
Source:
New York Amish, 2nd Edition
Author(s):

Karen Johnson-Weiner

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501707605.003.0010

This chapter reviews the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Wisconsin v. Yoder et al. and argues that it not only empowered Amish communities, but also encouraged Amish diversity by making it easier for them to operate their own one-room schoolhouses. As Ordnungs have changed, permitting a greater range of occupations, so too have the behaviors that characterize Amish life. And as Amish communities become more diverse, they will challenge secular authority in different ways. This is certainly true in New York State, where nearly two centuries after the first Amish arrived, New York Amish church communities continue to grow in both size and number. However, there is reason to believe that the State's Amish population will not continue to expand, challenging both Amish and non-Amish residents to accept new neighbors who look and act differently.

Keywords:   Amish communities, Amish diversity, Ordnungs, Amish life, secular authority, New York State, Amish church, non-Amish residents

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