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Strategic Adjustment and the Rise of ChinaPower and Politics in East Asia$
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Robert S. Ross

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781501709180

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501709180.001.0001

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The United States and China in Northeast Asia

The United States and China in Northeast Asia

Third-Party Coercion and Alliance Relations

Chapter:
(p.261) Chapter 9 The United States and China in Northeast Asia
Source:
Strategic Adjustment and the Rise of China
Author(s):

Robert S. Ross

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501709180.003.0010

This chapter examines alliance dynamics in U.S.–China relations in Northeast Asia. It analyzes how each nation has used third-party coercive diplomacy to compel the other to restrain its allies' challenges to great power security. A major objective of U.S. policy toward North Korea and the corresponding tension of the Korean Peninsula has been to compel China to exercise greater control over North Korea's nuclear weapons program. A major objective of Chinese policy toward Japan and the corresponding tension in the East China Sea has been to compel the United States to restrain Japanese challenges to Chinese sovereignty claims in disputed waters in the East China Sea. For a brief period, third-party coercion contributed to greater U.S.–China cooperation as each country adjusted its policies toward its respective ally, easing regional tension and U.S.–China conflict.

Keywords:   U.S.–China relations, Northeast Asia, third-party diplomacy, great power security, North Korea, Japan, regional tension, coercive diplomacy

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