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Sex, Love, and MigrationPostsocialism, Modernity, and Intimacy from Istanbul to the Arctic$
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Alexia Bloch

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781501713149

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501713149.001.0001

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“We are Like Slaves—Who Needs Capitalism?”

“We are Like Slaves—Who Needs Capitalism?”

Intimate Economies and Marginal, Mobile Households

Chapter:
(p.76) 3 “We are Like Slaves—Who Needs Capitalism?”
Source:
Sex, Love, and Migration
Author(s):

Alexia Bloch

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501713149.003.0004

This chapter provides a portrait of a community in southern Moldova that since the late 1990s has been significantly defined by outmigration, predominantly to Russia and Turkey. Accounts of two households tell the story of how people experienced the end of the Soviet Union and the inequalities of capitalism, including the retraction of state support for agriculture, but also the emergence of newly porous international borders that have become critical to an extensive remittance economy. The chapter examines how generation, class, ethnic heritage (as Gagauz or Moldovan), and gender are all factors in how people have pursued aspirations for mobility, often becoming labor migrants, but also turning to Evangelical networks or internet-facilitated marriages in efforts to cross increasingly policed borders.

Keywords:   Moldova, gender, generation, class, Gagauz, households, marriage, Evangelicals, labor migration, borders

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