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Rights, Not InterestsResolving Value Clashes under the National Labor Relations Act$
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James A. Gross

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781501714252

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501714252.001.0001

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Concluding Comments

Concluding Comments

Chapter:
(p.175) Concluding Comments
Source:
Rights, Not Interests
Author(s):

James A. Gross

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501714252.003.0008

The concluding chapter makes a number of points: the Act is not neutral, but is intended to promote and protect workers’ rights; the international community recognizes the freedom of association and collective bargaining as human rights; and calls for visionary thinking including elimination of employment at will, revamping law school education to connect with workplace realities, the Board to consider the perspectives of other legal systems around the world, consideration of the U.S. Constitution as a source of workers’ rights, and abandonment of the pluralist values which would transform workers’ rights into workers’ interests–self-interested, economic activity no different than business activity.

Keywords:   Human Rights, Wagner Act Values, Law School Education, NLRB Remedies, Captive Audience Speeches, U.S. Constitution, Values, Dunlop Commission

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