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The Last CardInside George W. Bush's Decision to Surge in Iraq $
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Timothy Sayle, Jeffrey A. Engel, Hal Brands, and William Inboden

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781501715181

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501715181.001.0001

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A Sweeping Internal Review

A Sweeping Internal Review

Mid–Late November 2006

Chapter:
(p.130) Chapter 6 A Sweeping Internal Review
Source:
The Last Card
Author(s):
Timothy Andrews Sayle, Jeffrey A. Engel, Hal Brands, William Inboden
Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501715181.003.0007

This chapter details the review process mentioned in the previous chapter. It highlights a series of high-level interagency meetings as the members of the review group debated the status of US efforts in Iraq and began formally to consider alternatives. By Thanksgiving of 2006, the review group was wrapping up its work, albeit without a clear policy recommendation, and divergent reviews remained among Bush's advisors. In retrospect, some of the president's advisors now believe that Bush himself was already leaning toward increasing US forces in Iraq as part of a new strategy. At the time, however, many thought the president had not made up his mind and that the deliberative process had simply deadlocked.

Keywords:   interagency meetings, US military efforts, Iraq, policy recommendation, George W. Bush, US forces, strategy review, Iraq strategy

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