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Smoking under the TsarsA History of Tobacco in Imperial Russia$
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Tricia Starks

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781501722059

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501722059.001.0001

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Papirosy and Dependence

Papirosy and Dependence

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction Papirosy and Dependence
Source:
Smoking under the Tsars
Author(s):

Tricia Starks

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501722059.003.0001

The introduction presents an innovative examination of the historically contingent nature of addiction as well as the context-specific reactions to smoking by describing the unique Russian cigarette (papirosy) and leaf (makhorka). The inhalation of tobacco and the high-nicotine Russian leaf created conditions for more addictive tobacco use with more profound health consequences earlier than anywhere else on the globe. By applying cultural history, gender theory, anthropology, material culture, and sensory studies to Russian smoking, the introduction sets up the construction of tobacco’s positive and negative image and the distinctions of space, class, and gender that the scent, sight, or mark of smoking created on the body, and by extension on social spaces and class structure.

Keywords:   Tobacco, Cigarettes, Russia, Addiction, Smoking

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