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The Clamor of LawyersThe American Revolution and Crisis in the Legal Profession$
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Peter Charles Hoffer and Williamjames Hull Hoffer

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781501726071

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501726071.001.0001

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“My Dear Countrymen Rouse Yourselves”

“My Dear Countrymen Rouse Yourselves”

Chapter:
(p.66) Chapter 3 “My Dear Countrymen Rouse Yourselves”
Source:
The Clamor of Lawyers
Author(s):

Peter Charles Hoffer

Williamjames Hull Hoffer

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501726071.003.0004

By 1774, events were pushing the lawyers to take sides whose lines of division could not be crossed. Nor could even the best connected of lawyers straddle these lines. One had to choose. Still, the lines that defined revolutionary and loyalist lawyering were only drawn in shifting sands. Had Parliament conceded some measure of colonial autonomy and had the revolutionary leadership been more patient with English policies, the crisis could have been averted or at least held at bay. But both sides seemed unwilling to acknowledge what continued intransigence would bring.

Keywords:   Letters from a Pennsylvania Farmer, Charles Townshend, John Dickinson, Benjamin Franklin, James Wilson, William Livingston, Boston Massacre trials, John Adams, Josiah Quincy Jr., Charles Carroll

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