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Workers without BordersPosted Work and Precarity in the EU$
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Ines Wagner

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781501729157

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501729157.001.0001

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Posted Worker Voice and Transnational Action

Posted Worker Voice and Transnational Action

Chapter:
(p.76) Chapter 4 Posted Worker Voice and Transnational Action
Source:
Workers without Borders
Author(s):

Ines Wagner

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501729157.003.0005

Chapter 4 shifts the perspective to power and mobilization theory to demonstrate how workers foster community and media support to address contentious workplace issues within the transnational space. Through an exemplary case, this chapter traces the process and explores the conditions under which re-territorialization can evolve in these transnational workspaces. The case examines an alliance in the meat industry between transnational posted workers, a local civil society organization, and the trade union. From an analytical perspective, the chapter considers these coalitions as examples of re-territorialization that is a form of resistance in increasingly de-territorialized labor markets. The case demonstrates that the transnational nature of posted workers’ employment relationship and living situation requires a different approach to organizing resistance beyond the traditional institutional perspectives on German trade unionism. The case goes against arguments that German trade unions traditionally refrain from forming coalitions because of their institutional position and Germany’s strong employment law.

Keywords:   Worker resistance, Organizing, Trade Unions, Community initiative

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