Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
ArchitectsPortraits of a Practice$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Thomas Yarrow

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781501738494

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: January 2020

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501738494.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM Cornell University Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.cornell.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Cornell University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in Cornell for personal use. date: 02 August 2021

Between One and One Another

Between One and One Another

Chapter:
(p.135) Between One and One Another
Source:
Architects
Author(s):

Thomas Yarrow

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501738494.003.0028

Design emerges through interactions with clients. It is also centrally shaped through interactions with others in the office.

The “Friday review” is the weekly slot where designs are discussed by the whole practice. During one of these sessions, Ronan is presenting ideas he has been working on. He starts by explaining the brief, which is simple: there is a house at the head of a wooded valley; the house doesn’t make the most of its site and isn’t well adapted to the needs of the clients who live in it, a middle-aged couple with older children. He notes, in passing, that they own the local builders merchants, a detail that is not elaborated but, in the absence of a fixed budget, seems intended to convey the likelihood the budget will be generous. He illustrates the site with plans and maps, gesturing and pointing as he talks. As he describes what he shows, he shuffles and rearranges papers, moving between a map of the site, plans of the building, and images of the site. What Ronan shows through this description is a building on a steep slope, “marooned” at the edge of a large plot. The views are “fantastic,” but windows and rooms are configured so that the views are rarely seen. The existing building is “uninspiring.” Ronan shows us some of his ideas. My untrained eyes focus on the elegant tidiness of his pencil sketches, but Ronan doesn’t see this: looking at his plans and sketches, he is looking at an idea that doesn’t quite work, a solution he can’t yet see....

Cornell Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.