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ArchitectsPortraits of a Practice$
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Thomas Yarrow

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781501738494

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: January 2020

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501738494.001.0001

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Where Knowledge Meets

Where Knowledge Meets

Chapter:
(p.179) Where Knowledge Meets
Source:
Architects
Author(s):

Thomas Yarrow

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501738494.003.0040

Mill House is a Cotswold stone structure, with a grade 2 “listing”—an acknowledgment of the building’s historical significance that affords formal protection through the planning system. Originally a working mill, it was bought by its current owners about a year ago. Mark and Cathy are accountants, in the process of moving from London—for her to retire and for him to commute. Tomas and Megan are here for a project meeting. Already, the broad outlines of the design have been agreed: Mark and Cathy were drawn to the character of the building and want to retain as much of the history as possible; but as they see it, the building has too many small rooms, insufficient light, and a poor connection to the garden. A number of schemes were initially considered. The most radical of these was the one they ultimately decided on; the essence of the plan is simple and was arrived at quickly: a small external courtyard—formed on three sides by the existing house and a barn to the rear—will be enclosed by a glass roof, creating an internal space that other rooms will open onto. As the project moves from concept development to detailing, there are many issues still to resolve. On this occasion considerations of cost are less central than those relating to planning approval and the technical feasibility of the proposed design concept....

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