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Migration in the Time of RevolutionChina, Indonesia, and the Cold War$
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Taomo Zhou

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781501739934

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501739934.001.0001

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“The Motherland Is a Distant Dream”

“The Motherland Is a Distant Dream”

Chapter:
(p.211) Conclusion “The Motherland Is a Distant Dream”
Source:
Migration in the Time of Revolution
Author(s):

Taomo Zhou

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501739934.003.0012

This concluding chapter describes how the ebb and flow of diplomatic relations affected the lives of ordinary overseas Chinese in three ways. Overall, the Chinese, loathed for their perceived dominance in commerce, became easy targets for violence during times of political instability and economic downturn. First, discord in bilateral relations usually amplified antagonism toward the ethnic Chinese. Second, anti-Chinese riots persisted even when bilateral relations were cordial. Third, diplomatic frictions implicated both Indonesian citizens of Chinese descent and Chinese nationals living in Indonesia. Notwithstanding the changing status of diplomatic relations, there had always been pribumi groups that accused all ethnic Chinese of being pawns of a foreign power irrespective of their citizenship status and ideological inclination. Stemming from long-standing social, economic, and political circumstances in Indonesia, this prejudice was also influenced by the way the Chinese Nationalist and Communist governments conducted diplomacy in Indonesia. Both governments instrumentalized the overseas Chinese to advance their respective foreign policy objectives.

Keywords:   diplomatic relations, overseas Chinese, ethnic Chinese, anti-Chinese riots, citizenship, Chinese Nationalist government, Chinese Communist government, diplomacy, foreign policy

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