Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Take Back Our FutureAn Eventful Sociology of the Hong Kong Umbrella Movement$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Ching Kwan Lee and Ming Sing

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781501740916

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501740916.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM Cornell University Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.cornell.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Cornell University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in Cornell for personal use. date: 21 September 2021

Mediascape and Movement

Mediascape and Movement

The Dynamics of Political Communication, Public and Counterpublic

Chapter:
(p.100) 5 Mediascape and Movement
Source:
Take Back Our Future
Author(s):

Francis L. F. Lee

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501740916.003.0005

This chapter reviews the relationship between the media and the Umbrella Movement. The mainstream media, aided by digital media outlets and platforms, play the important role of the public monitor in times of major social conflicts, even though the Hong Kong media do so in an environment where partial censorship exists. The impact of digital media in largescale protest movements is similarly multifaceted and contradictory. Digital media empower social protests by promoting oppositional discourses, facilitating mobilization, and contributing to the emergence of connective action. However, they also introduce and exacerbate forces of decentralization that present challenges to movement leaders. Meanwhile, during and after the Umbrella Movement, one can also see how the state has become more proactive in online political communication, thus trying to undermine the oppositional character of the Internet in Hong Kong.

Keywords:   mainstream media, Umbrella Movement, digital media, public monitor, Hong Kong media, partial censorship, social protests, decentralization, online political communication, Internet

Cornell Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.