Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Suspect Saints and Holy HereticsDisputed Sanctity and Communal Identity in Late Medieval Italy$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Janine Larmon Peterson

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781501742347

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501742347.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM Cornell University Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.cornell.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Cornell University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in Cornell for personal use. date: 26 July 2021

Economics, Patronage, and Politics

Economics, Patronage, and Politics

Chapter:
(p.119) Chapter 5 Economics, Patronage, and Politics
Source:
Suspect Saints and Holy Heretics
Author(s):

Janine Larmon Peterson

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501742347.003.0006

This chapter assesses a number of motives beyond religious devotion that played a part in local veneration. There were economic, social, and political considerations that motivated segments of society to support regional cults even with the threat of papal or inquisitorial censure. Earthly rewards included the wealth that accrued to a church or a town, the prestige of establishing a cult, and the benefits of promoting a new saint as a holy patron for resolving political disputes, either between rival factions within a town, between towns, or between a town and the papacy. The chapter then considers wealth and patronage, looking at the cult of Guglielma of Milan, which serves as a centerpiece to demonstrate this concatenation of motives. It also examines a saint's role in promoting peace in war-torn late medieval Italy. The chapter therefore moves from economic to political motives, and from a narrower focus on individuals and institutions to broader considerations of community and region.

Keywords:   religious devotion, regional cults, papacy, inquisitorial censure, wealth, patronage, political disputes, Guglielma of Milan

Cornell Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.