Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
A Precarious GameThe Illusion of Dream Jobs in the Video Game Industry$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Ergin Bulut

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781501746529

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: September 2020

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501746529.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM Cornell University Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.cornell.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Cornell University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in Cornell for personal use. date: 25 September 2021

Game Testers as Precarious Second-Class Citizens

Game Testers as Precarious Second-Class Citizens

Degradation of Fun, Instrumentalization of Play

Chapter:
(p.122) 6 Game Testers as Precarious Second-Class Citizens
Source:
A Precarious Game
Author(s):

Ergin Bulut

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501746529.003.0007

This chapter focuses on another group of marginalized actors in the game industry: game testers. As a means of getting one's foot in the industry, video game testing constitutes an arena of “cruel optimism.” Video game testing is a decidedly temporary position appealing mostly to young people with fewer occupational skills than the core creatives. Testers endure extreme precarity in hopes of garnering the symbolic capital they gain in the industry, a permanent position, or new job in one of development's other disciplines, such as design, art, or programming. The chapter coins the term “degradation of fun” to illuminate the process through which the joy derived from testing is diminished due to precarity, instrumentalized play, and surveillance in the workplace.

Keywords:   game industry, game testers, video game testing, precarity, instrumentalized play, workplace surveillance

Cornell Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.