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Nature beyond SolitudeNotes from the Field$
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John Seibert Farnsworth

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781501747281

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: September 2020

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501747281.001.0001

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Notes from the Golden Gate Raptor Observatory

Notes from the Golden Gate Raptor Observatory

Chapter:
(p.87) 3 Notes from the Golden Gate Raptor Observatory
Source:
Nature beyond Solitude
Author(s):

John Seibert Farnsworth

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501747281.003.0003

This chapter highlights the author's field notes from the Golden Gate Raptor Observatory (GRRO). A hawkwatcher with the GGRO commits to a rotation during the fall migration, basically mid-August to early December, participating on a team at least one day every other week. The author's team has an exceptional level of experience. The training was rigorous, but the GGRO style was reassuring. The rule for beginners is “When you see a hawk, start to talk.” They had to learn not only the field marks of the nineteen species they might encounter, but also the local topography, where every landmark goes by a distinct name. As a general rule, the more northerly the winds, the better the hawkwatching. The birds, after all, are heading south, and most of them are smart enough to avoid migrating into a headwind whenever possible. The author was especially interested in raptors and ferruginous hawks.

Keywords:   Golden Gate Raptor Observatory, hawkwatcher, bird migration, hawkwatching, raptors, ferruginous hawks

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