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Turfgrass Insects of the United States and Canada$
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Patricia J. Vittum

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781501747953

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: January 2021

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501747953.001.0001

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Hemipteran Pests: Suborder Homoptera

Hemipteran Pests: Suborder Homoptera

Chapter:
(p.87) 7 Hemipteran Pests: Suborder Homoptera
Source:
Turfgrass Insects of the United States and Canada
Author(s):

Patricia J. Vittum

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501747953.003.0007

This chapter assesses several kinds of insects in the suborder Homoptera which are turfgrass pests. These include the greenbug (an aphid), two-lined spittlebug, several species of mealybugs, and several scales. Mealybugs and scales are in the superfamily of scales, Coccoidea. Mealybugs occur worldwide and are widely distributed throughout the United States. Immature mealybugs are called “crawlers,” and may move from where they hatched. Adult female mealybugs are wingless and resemble the immatures in shape. Males resemble tiny gnats, with a single pair of wings and three pairs of red, simple eyes. The life cycles of most turf-inhabiting species of mealybugs are not well understood. The chapter then looks at the Rhodegrass mealybug, buffalograss mealybugs, and the ground pearl.

Keywords:   Homoptera, turfgrass pests, greenbug, two-lined spittlebug, mealybugs, scales, Coccoidea, Rhodegrass mealybug, buffalograss mealybugs, ground pearl

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