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Despotism on DemandHow Power Operates in the Flexible Workplace$
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Alex J. Wood

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781501748875

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: January 2021

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501748875.001.0001

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Despotic Time in the UK

Despotic Time in the UK

Overcoming Hegemonic Constraints

Chapter:
(p.75) 3 Despotic Time in the UK
Source:
Despotism on Demand
Author(s):

Alex J. Wood

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501748875.003.0004

This chapter traces the historical evolution of working time and internal labor markets in the United Kingdom. The term “internal labor market” refers to the shielding of employment relations from the external labor market through mechanisms such as seniority policies, employment protections, internal promotion ladders, and differentiated job structures based on skill and knowledge development. The chapter then looks at the temporal organization of labor at PartnershipCo. It considers wage rates and pay structure, employment protections, mobility, and promotion opportunities, but finds that flexible scheduling is the most significant means of securing control. Flexible scheduling was found to be highly manager-controlled, even when institutionalized working time regulations were present.

Keywords:   working time, internal labor markets, United Kingdom, employment relations, PartnershipCo, employment protections, flexible scheduling, workplace control, working time regulations

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