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Intimacy across the FencelinesIntimacy across the Fencelines$
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Rebecca Forgash

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781501750403

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: January 2021

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501750403.001.0001

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Race, Memory, and Military Men’s Sexuality

Race, Memory, and Military Men’s Sexuality

Chapter:
(p.50) 2 Race, Memory, and Military Men’s Sexuality
Source:
Intimacy across the Fencelines
Author(s):

Rebecca Forgash

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501750403.003.0003

This chapter analyzes Okinawan discourses on race and military men's sexuality, with a focus on how Japanese and American racial discourses have shaped local understandings of difference. It discusses how the imperial rhetoric positioned Okinawans and other Asians alongside the Japanese in unified opposition to Europeans and Americans. During the postwar occupation, the U.S. military and its personnel were introduced into the Okinawa discourses on U.S. imperialism in Asia, Jim Crow segregation, and the 1960s civil rights and black power movements. The chapter also features the personal narratives of individuals who self-consciously viewed their relationships as transgressing established racial boundaries. It narrates stories that illustrate the struggle of military international couples in order to understand and rework racial ideologies and expectations in Okinawa's postwar society.

Keywords:   Okinawan discourses, racial discourses, postwar occupation, U.S. imperialism, Jim Crow segregation, black power movements, racial boundaries, postwar society, U.S. military men, sexuality, race

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