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Black Lives and Spatial MattersPolicing Blackness and Practicing Freedom in Suburban St. Louis$
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Jodi Rios

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781501750465

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: January 2021

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501750465.001.0001

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Coda

Coda

Archipelagoes of Life

Chapter:
(p.211) Coda
Source:
Black Lives and Spatial Matters
Author(s):

Jodi Rios

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501750465.003.0010

This coda explains how a cultural politics of race and space relies on the logics of antiblackness as described throughout the previous chapters. As a fundamental technique of biopower, power over life, this politics deploys culture to produce and police disposable yet profitable bodies in North St. Louis County. But to theorize the experience of living under the “racial state of municipal governance” as solely a form of social death denies how relations of power are dependent upon possibilities for resistance. While most people outside the protest family consider the Ferguson Protest Movement to be over, those whose lives were transformed across space and time are committed to fight in registers that go beyond those recognized by the liberal state. This resistance and the capacity to imagine other worlds crop up across the globe and are connected through a radical relationality that not only multiplies “the reals” but maps that which is currently unimaginable. Together these outcroppings create archipelagoes of life that sit within the sea of unsustainable ways of being and doing.

Keywords:   cultural politics, antiblackness, biopower, North St. Louis County, racial state, municipal governance, Ferguson Protest Movement, resistance, race, space

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