Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Detestable and Wicked ArtsNew England and Witchcraft in the Early Modern Atlantic World$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Paul B. Moyer

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781501751059

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501751059.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM Cornell University Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.cornell.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Cornell University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in Cornell for personal use. date: 27 June 2022

“Hanged for a Witch”

“Hanged for a Witch”

Witch-Hunting in New England before 1670

Chapter:
(p.10) Chapter 1 “Hanged for a Witch”
Source:
Detestable and Wicked Arts
Author(s):

Paul B. Moyer

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501751059.003.0002

This chapter presents a narrative of witch-hunting in New England between the late 1630s and 1670 and begins the process of placing it in the broader context of the English Atlantic. It examines the process by which cases of occult crime took shape. It also illuminates the transatlantic dimensions of witch prosecutions in the Puritan colonies and addresses questions essential to understanding the phenomenon of witch-hunting in the early modern period. The chapter mentions Alice Young of Windsor, Connecticut who appears to have been the first person executed for witchcraft in New England. It investigates how Young's execution marked the beginning of an intense period of witch-hunting in New England.

Keywords:   witch-hunting, New England, occult crime, witch prosecutions, Puritan colonies, Alice Young

Cornell Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.