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Race-ing FargoRefugees, Citizenship, and the Transformation of Small Cities$
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Jennifer Erickson

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781501751134

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501751134.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Prairie for the People

Chapter:
(p.213) Conclusion
Source:
Race-ing Fargo
Author(s):

Jennifer Erickson

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501751134.003.0008

This chapter concludes that globalized capitalism has resulted in unprecedented amounts of goods, services, ideas, and people circulating the planet, which has provoked a range of responses at the local level, from excitement and acceptance of new forms of diversity, to fear, aversion, and panic, depending on one's experiences and point of view. The ever-increasing numbers of refugees and immigrants around the world calls into question the role of the nation state and how citizenship has been defined and practiced at national and local levels. It states that cities also host parallel assemblages, where even chance encounters with certain groups of people (for example, New Americans) are minimal and lack context and meaning, which can serve to fuel fear and hate. The chapter discusses “incipient commoning”, and how sensationalist media has shaped the contours of the refugee resettlement debate in Fargo.

Keywords:   globalized capitalism, refugees, immigrants, nation state, citizenship, refugee resettlement, Fargo, incipient commoning

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