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The Inconvenient JournalistA Memoir$
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Dusko Doder and Louise Branson

Print publication date: 2021

Print ISBN-13: 9781501759093

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: January 2022

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501759093.001.0001

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Post Moscow Correspondent at Last

Post Moscow Correspondent at Last

Chapter:
(p.91) 7 Post Moscow Correspondent at Last
Source:
The Inconvenient Journalist
Author(s):

Dusko Doder

Louise Branson

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501759093.003.0008

This chapter highlights the author's return to Moscow as the Washington Post's correspondent. The mood in Moscow had changed; the seventy-four-year-old Leonid Brezhnev, in power for seventeen years, was surrounded by an aging leadership that valued stability and its privileged way of life. Though the Kremlin was still spouting the same rhetoric about Communism marching toward a bright future, there was an air of disillusion and resignation all over Moscow. As the severe Moscow winter of 1981–82 took hold, the weather matched a deepening chill in US–Soviet relations. The Kremlin lambasted Ronald Reagan for “a campaign of hatred” against the Soviet Union and for wanting to “hurl the world back to the dark ages of the Cold War.” The chapter then considers how the author's relationship with the US embassy in Moscow deteriorated as his analysis began often to diverge from that of the embassy and the CIA.

Keywords:   Moscow, Washington Post, correspondent, Leonid Brezhnev, Kremlin, Communism, US–Soviet relations, Soviet Union, US embassy, CIA

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